Faith, Hope and Love

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One of my favorite Christmas songs is “Boy from the Woods.” It’s not particularly religious (God is mentioned but Jesus isn’t) but it is moral and describes the exact kind of life that a secular humanist strives to live. It is based on those traditional values of faith, hope and love.

Faith, of course, means something quite different to an atheist than it does to someone who is religious. I don’t place my faith in a higher power; I undertake something much more difficult, I put my faith in my fellow man. I honestly believe (for those of you who wonder what atheists believe) that people are capable of great good. This, despite the evidence that they are also capable of great evil, is what sustains me and makes it possible for me to get up and face the day. It is clear to me that given the chance, most people will choose to do the right thing rather than the wrong one – not because of promise of reward or fear of punishment – but because it is part of fundamental nature to be altruistic. This is not blind selflessness. Rather it is something evolution has created as an advantage for creatures who cannot survive alone, outside of social situations. You may point out the occasional loner or hermit but I can tell you they would never have gotten out of their crib if not for the multi-year support of a social construct.

So faith is an important part of my daily life – but no gods are required. Simply civilization and human progress – something we continue to make despite the best efforts of certain politicians and religious leaders to prevent it.

Hope is essential to our on-going existence. This becomes increasingly clear to me as I grow older. It seems that not a day goes by without some further bad news – not the kind that is broadcast on the TV but the personal kind, of friends who have sickened or died, relatives who have fallen on hard times, businesses that have failed. Life is filled with bad news and bad news has a way of impacting and weighing on you in ways that good news doesn’t seem to do. Hope is what we use to shed those burdens – hope that tomorrow will be a better day. That a friend will recover or at least hold on long enough so you can be together one more time – or ten. Hope is the thing that makes us look at children and think – maybe they can solve the problems we failed to get around to (or created). Sometimes it is hard to be optimistic – the glass seems to be draining fast – but what other choice do we have? The future is unknowable but I suspect that our attitude towards it will help shape it.

And finally there is love. It does triumph over fear and hate. Sometimes we need to be reminded of that. A little hug at the right moment is restorative. Putting your hand in your pocket to feed someone who is hungry may restore their faith and hope. And faith and hope doubled can’t be a bad thing, right?

Faith, hope and love. You know you have it in you. Just look at your moral compass and it will show you the way.

And that’s ten minutes.

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